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Republic of

Cameroon

Teacher Resources

Thank you for exchanging artwork with children in Cameroon!

Feel free to use the following resources if you'd like to teach your students about the children and culture of Cameroon while they create their artwork. 

Overview

Known as "Africa in miniature", The Republic of Cameroon is a country in Central Africa with vast geographical and cultural diversity, home to more than 24 million people. The official languages of Cameroon are English and French because the French and British governments colonized Cameroon after World War I, though the people speak more than 200 different languages and make up more than 200 ethnic groups. Cameroon it has one of the highest literacy rates in the continent, however, progress in Cameroon has been stifled by corruption, authoritarian rule, violent conflict between the English-speaking population and the government, and an insurgency by the jihadist group Boko Haram that has displaced over one million women, men, and children.

Helpful Links

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CAMERONIAN CULTURE

Get a generalized overview of Cameronian culture from this guide by AFS.

CAMERONIAN CUISINE

See what delicious delicacies are native to Cameroon with this Trip 101 Guide.

DIVIDED BY LANGUAGE

Learn all about the violent conflict between English-speaking secessionists and the French-speaking government that borders on civil war in this Washington Post article.

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TRADITIONAL DANCES

Dance and music are an important part of Cameronian culture. Get a glimpse at some of Cameroon's traditional dances in this video on Youtube. 

HUMAN RIGHTS

This Human Rights Watch report details the many human rights violations that the Cameronian population confronts daily by Boko Haram and their own government.

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